In memory of Bob

For those who haven’t heard of Bob (where have you been?!) he’s a plucky ginger chap who met busker, James Bowen whilst they were both living on the streets of London.  They formed a truly remarkable partnership that was lovingly recorded in the book, A Street Cat Named Bob – if you’ve not read this genuinely heart-warming story, I’d hugely recommend it.  Bob is a hero amongst kitties, and who sadly passed away today.  

Here’s a few of our favourite quotes from his books, with a few photos of this brave, gentle, handsome boy, from Bob’s own Facebook account:

“I can never repay what he’s done for me, he’s paid back my kindness a million billion fold.”

“Cats are notoriously picky about who they like. And if a cat doesn’t like its owner it will go and find another one. Cats do that all the time.” 

“I tried to sneak in without him seeing me. It was a stupid move. He was a cat, he had more senses in one of his whiskers than I had in my entire body. No sooner had I opened the door to the building than he was there squeezing his way in.” 

“Having Bob gave me a chance to interact with people…. Cats are notoriously picky about who they like. Seeing me with my cat softened me in [others] eyes. It humanised me. Especially after I’d been so de-humanised. In some ways it was giving me back my identity. I had been a non-person; I was becoming a person again.” 

“I’d heard about cats watching TV from a friend whose cat loved Star Trek: The Next Generation. Whenever it heard that familiar music − Dah-Dah Dah Dah Dah-Dah Dah Dah − he’d come running into the room and jump on the sofa. I saw it happen a few times and it was hilarious. No joke. Pretty” 

“A few moments later the bus pulled up. It was an old-fashioned red double-decker bus that you could jump on at the back. I went to sit on the bench at the back of the bus and was placing my guitar case in the storage space near where the conductor was standing when, behind me, I saw a sudden flash of ginger fur. Before I knew it, Bob had jumped up and plonked himself on the seat next to where I was sitting.” 

“Having Bob there gave me a chance to interact with people. They would ask about Bob and I would get a chance to explain my situation at the same time. They would ask where he came from and I’d then be able to explain how we got together and how we were making money to pay our rent, food, electricity and gas bills. People would give me more of a fair hearing. Psychologically, people also began to see me in a different light. Cats are notoriously picky about who they like. And if a cat doesn’t like its owner it will go and find another one. Cats do that all the time. They go and live with somebody else. Seeing me with my cat softened me in their eyes. It humanised me. Especially after I’d been so dehumanised. In some ways it was giving me back my identity. I had been a non-person; I was becoming a person again.” 

“I was raised as a churchgoer but I wasn’t a practising Christian. I wasn’t an agnostic or atheist either. My view is that we should all take a bit from every religion and philosophy. I’m not a Buddhist but I like Buddhist philosophies, in particular. They give you a very good structure that you can build your life around. For instance, I definitely believe in karma, the idea that what goes around, comes around. I wondered whether Bob was my reward for having done something good, somewhere in my troubled life.”

Rest in peace, Bob 💖 

2 thoughts on “In memory of Bob

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